Start Single hermaphrodite

Single hermaphrodite

Upon fertilization of the two ova by two sperm cells (one carrying an X chromosome and the other carrying a Y chromosome), the two fertilized ova are then fused together resulting in a person having dual genitalial, gonadal (ovotestes) and genetic sex.

According to Ovid, he fused with the nymph Salmacis resulting in one individual possessing physical traits of male and female sexes; Alexander ab Alexandro stated, using the term hermaphrodite, that the people who bore the sexes of both man and woman were regarded by the Athenians and the Romans as monsters, and thrown into the sea at Athens and into the Tiber at Rome.

This contrasts simultaneous hermaphrodites, in which an individual may possess fully functional male and female genitalia.

The SRY is then activated in only certain areas, causing development of testes in some areas by beginning a series of events starting with the upregulation of SOX9, and in other areas not being active (causing the growth of ovarian tissues).

Early observations of spotted hyenas in the wild led researchers to believe that all spotted hyenas, male and female, were born with what appeared to be a penis.

Intersex describes a wide variety of combinations of what are considered male and female biology.

Intersex biology may include, for example, ambiguous-looking external genitalia, karyotypes that include mixed XX and XY chromosome pairs (46XX/46XY, 46XX/47XXY or 45X/XY mosaic).

Clinically, medicine currently describes intersex people as having disorders of sex development, a term vigorously contested.