Start Poems on christian dating

Poems on christian dating

Poems so vividly individuated invite attention to the circumstances that shaped them.

Donne may no longer be the cult figure he became in the 1920s and 1930s, when T. Eliot and William Butler Yeats, among others, discovered in his poetry the peculiar fusion of intellect and passion and the alert contemporariness which they aspired to in their own art.

He is not a poet for all tastes and times; yet for many readers Donne remains what Ben Jonson judged him: “the first poet in the world in some things.” His poems continue to engage the attention and challenge the experience of readers who come to him afresh.

It was not until the end of the 1800s that Donne’s poetry was eagerly taken up by a growing band of avant-garde readers and writers. In the first two decades of the 20th century Donne’s poetry was decisively rehabilitated.

The more perilous the encounters of clandestine lovers, the greater zest they have for their pleasures, whether they seek to outwit the disapproving world, or a jealous husband, or a forbidding and deeply suspicious father, as in , “The Perfume”: Though he had wont to search with glazed eyes, As though he came to kill a cockatrice, Though he have oft sworn, that he would remove Thy beauty’s beauty, and food of our love, Hope of his goods, if I with thee were seen, Yet close and secret, as our souls, we have been.

Some of Donne’s finest love poems, such as “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning,” prescribe the condition of a mutual attachment that time and distance cannot diminish: Dull sublunary lovers’ love (Whose soul is sense) cannot admit Absence, because it doth remove Those things which elemented it.

But we by a love, so much refined, That our selves know not what it is, Inter-assured of the mind, Care less, eyes, lips, and hands to miss.

In Donne’s own day his poetry was highly prized among the small circle of his admirers, who read it as it was circulated in manuscript, and in his later years he gained wide fame as a preacher.