Start Mean ceramic dating formula

Mean ceramic dating formula

Hard-paste porcelain came from East Asia, specifically China, and some of the finest quality porcelain wares are from this category.

Datasets from historical sites around the Chesapeake Bay and a synagogue site in Jamaica allow an assessment of the statistical precision of formula dates.

The results suggest that archaeologists should report these dates with their standard deviations and not as single-number results.

These principles allow extension of the methods to prehistoric cases in some circumstances.

The formulas, however, produce single numbers that may be misleading in their apparent precision.

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) is a ceramic material made by heating materials, generally including kaolin, in a kiln to temperatures between 1,200 and 1,400 °C (2,200 and 2,600 °F).

Properties associated with porcelain include low permeability and elasticity; considerable strength, hardness, toughness, whiteness, translucency and resonance; and a high resistance to chemical attack and thermal shock.

Porcelain has been described as being "completely vitrified, hard, impermeable (even before glazing), white or artificially coloured, translucent (except when of considerable thickness), and resonant".

Later, the composition of the Meissen hard paste was changed and the alabaster was replaced by feldspar and quartz, allowing the pieces to be fired at lower temperatures.

Kaolinite, feldspar and quartz (or other forms of silica) continue to constitute the basic ingredients for most continental European hard-paste porcelains.

The English had read the letters of Jesuit missionary François Xavier d'Entrecolles, which described Chinese porcelain manufacturing secrets in detail.